Marijuana Petitions in Troy Full of Signature Shenanigans –  Deadline Detroit


Serious people in Michigan are making serious arguments in favor of reforming state laws around marijuana. They’re talking medical research, tax policy, land use, zoning. They don’t appreciate it when the people around them make Cheech and Chong jokes about their work, much as the C-suite at, for instance, Seagram’s or Anheuser-Busch or some other alcoholic-beverage concern probably don’t go around laughing at I-was-so-drunk jokes. 


On the other hand, sometimes people involved in the weed business act like they’re in the DVD extras of an actual Cheech and Chong movie.


 


In Troy, the city council recently voted to opt out of allowing marijuana cultivation businesses in the city. In response, a group calling itself Citizens for a Responsible Troy, delivered a stack of petitions in an effort to put a city-charter amendment question allowing such facilities on the November ballot. The number of signatures fell short of the 2,925 needed, but also? 


“There’s apparently a lot of fraud on these petitions,” [City Councilman Dave] Henderson said Tuesday – starting with his very own name, he said.


The Freep’s Bill Laitner has the story:


“Obviously, there’s no way I would sign this,” Henderson said, referring to petitions that favored overturning Troy’s local ban on medical-marijuana growing facilities.


Others whose names showed up on the petitions included City Councilman Ethan Baker, who also voted with the majority on the council to “opt out” of allowing medical-marijuana cultivation businesses in the city. . . .


As for County Commissioner Wade Fleming, his ersatz signature appears not just once but twice in the 516 pages of petitions, a clear violation of state petition-gathering rules.


“I didn’t even sign it once,” Fleming said, chuckling when the Free Press reached him Tuesday. 


Duuude. 


The petitions are full of these little surprises, which were no doubt hilarious when the people who did it were adding them. Alas, now they may end up in legal jeopardy, as such acts are illegal. A lawyer for Citizens for a Responsible Troy is “sick” about it, he says. 

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